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GMU’s John Schuler to present

News and Events | Comments Off on GMU’s John Schuler to present

The Research Colloquium on Computational Social Science/Data Sciences speaker for Friday, November 08, 2019, will be John Schuler, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Economics, George Mason University. John’s talk entitled “The Econometrics of Prices in a Network Economy” will begin at 3:00 in the Center for Social Complexity Suite located on the 3rd floor of Research Hall. The talk will be followed by a Q&A session along with light refreshments.

This session will be live-streamed on the YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7YCR-pBTZ_9865orDNVHNA

For announcements regarding this and future streams, please join the CSS/CDS student and alumni Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/257383120973297/

For a list of upcoming and previous seminars, please visit: https://cos.gmu.edu/cds/calendar/

Abstract: According to classical economic theory, removing money from the economy should result in prices falling. However, there is some evidence of so-called Cantillon effects where some prices initially move in the wrong direction. There exists an agent-based model that replicates this phenomenon using a network model. My focus is on the econometric plausibility of this model. I will demonstrate a preliminary statistical model to defend the assumptions made for the agent-based model.

Bio: John Schuler is a fifth year PhD student in the Department of Economics at George Mason University. John graduated from American University with an MS in statistics in 2017 and from St. John’s College with a BA in liberal arts in 2009. He also spent a year at the University of Maryland, College Park studying mathematics post-baccalaureate, and more recently he spent the Spring 2018 semester as a visiting assistant professor at Washington College. His research interests involve the interface of computer science and economics as well as agent based macroeconomics.